Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Biodiesel, Veggie, CNG, Solar, Wind, Cow-chip, Nuclear and other alternative power...
Tigman
Regular Member
Posts: 515
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 7:36 pm
Location: Central Ohio
Isuzu vehicle(s): Factory 1985 S10 2.2 Diesel, 1989 Isuzu 4x4 2.2 Turbo Diesel, 1999 Chevy Suburban 6.5 Turbo Diesel

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby Tigman » Fri Dec 11, 2015 7:15 pm

Gary, PM sent.

User avatar
iPupGary
Regular Member
Posts: 505
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:56 pm
Location: Vancouver, WA

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby iPupGary » Fri Dec 11, 2015 7:29 pm

Clair,

Yes, I'm planning to use one toggle switch to control both valves. I can't see any reason to control them individually at this point. I'll put the toggle switch near the wood stove so I can turn off the system when the wood stove door is open.

I'm going to ditch the precision flow control valve in favor of using the atomizer tip to control oil flow. They are cheap enough. And now I have the plugging issue fixed with the insulating phenolic tube, it should be quite reliable. You can control the oil flow to a point with changing air pressure.

I may use a 0.4 gallon per hour tip in the dead of winter and a 0.1 GPH tip for the milder temperatures. The simplifies things greatly.

I'm planning to control my valves and stove with a computer controller. I hope to develop a water based heat exchanger system in the future . The computer will provide the expansion and flexibility to control a complex system, if needed.

You could control the whole thing with a toggle switch and a button style thermal switch. I would find one that is rated about 400 degrees F (~200C). You'll need to measure your stove temperature in which the veggie will ignite. In my application it's about 350 F to 400 F on the top plate of the stove.

The only button style thermal switch rated in the 400F range is a thermal cut-out switch which has normally closed. This would require you to use a relay to reverse the Logic to a Normally Open thermal switch unless you can find one.

Here is a 200 C Normally Close thermal Switch on eBay. Again you'll need to use a relay to reverse the logic to Normally Open.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Thermal-Termal-temperature-Switch-SW-200c-200-degrees-15A-250V-Normally-Close-/271900019084

I'll post something on de-watering within a few days. I got to get back to hacking computer code. I'm developing code to fully automate my veggie processing system. I'll be able to process (clean and de-water) 275 gallons in 11 hours with a touch of one button. Wish me luck...

-Gary
1982 Chevy Luv 2wd short bed diesel w/ veggie conversion (under construction)
1999 Isuzu Trooper 3.5L Gas

Tigman
Regular Member
Posts: 515
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 7:36 pm
Location: Central Ohio
Isuzu vehicle(s): Factory 1985 S10 2.2 Diesel, 1989 Isuzu 4x4 2.2 Turbo Diesel, 1999 Chevy Suburban 6.5 Turbo Diesel

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby Tigman » Fri Dec 11, 2015 8:09 pm

Gary, I am excited to get moving on this project, can you clarify your plumbing arrangement. Am I seeing that you are pressurizing with 3# of air on one side of the "T" and introducing your oil on the opposite side of that "T"? I can't tell where your other air supply line is coming from for the valve body, how much pressure is needed there? Could you maybe post a simple schematic or drawing? I understand your still tweeking your system but this will give anyone interested a great head start. Thanks

User avatar
iPupGary
Regular Member
Posts: 505
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:56 pm
Location: Vancouver, WA

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby iPupGary » Fri Dec 11, 2015 8:27 pm

Clair,

I forgot to answer your question about the complex plumbing I used in the Veggie stove.

Simply gravity feed your oil to the atomizer. You may want to place a ball valve in series with the electric valve in case the electric valve goes south.

Be sure to use a filter before the electric solenoid valve. It doesn't take much to plug a diaphragm electric valve. Use a 300 micron (50 mesh) filter. Any finer filter is not necessary and may plug up prematurely. Any larger and the smallest tip available, 0.1 GPH Tip may plug up.

Here is a filter that the eBay supplier recommended. The Manufacturer is: COMBU. The Patriot (supplier) Product Code: 40130. Its a bit spendy but it's re-usable (cleanable) and should last a long time. Banjo makes a lower cost strainer/filter (50 mesh) but I'm not sure how well it will work with heavy oils. It may be worth a try considering the cost difference.:

https://www.patriot-supply.com/products/showitem.cfm/COMBU_40130

Banjo:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Banjo-LSTM050-50C-Polypropylene-Mini-T-Strainer-with-Clear-Bowl-50-Mesh-1-2-/252168265325?hash=item3ab6665e6d:g:lzEAAOSw5ZBWHTMl

Banjo makes some nice stuff. I've use tons of their cam-lock connectors.

As far as the air setup is concerned, I use a harbor feight Regualtor/Filter/Water Trap:

http://www.harborfreight.com/industrial-air-filter-regulator-68247.html

Just a little warning with the harbor freight regulator. It's real hit or miss as far as the quality of this regulator. I had to return one because it wouldn't regulate down to 1 PSI. The repalcement was fine. You may want to consider a higher quality unit from a US based company. Be prepared to return it to the store if doesn't work fully. Verify the functionality before modifying the regualtor. You may have to return it. LOL.

Place the electric valve on the low pressure side of the regulator. Why stress it with a higher pressure.

Ignore my other "Lash Up" in the video. I was trying to develop a clever way to clean out the clogged Devalan Atomizer Tip with compressed air. Now that I've solved the tip plugging issue with the phenolic tube, this complex system isn't necessary.

You may want to experiment with other materials than Phenolic. Fiberglass tube might work just as well. The tube may be exposed to temperatures in excess of 430 F. I'm not sure if Phenolic is the best choice. I used it because I had it "kicking" around the shop.

I'm going to experiment with other tube designs. I would like to get the atomizer a little closer to the stove. But make sure not to expose the tip to excessive temperatures or the veggie will cook inside the atomizer and the tip will plug. If you made bio-diesel this problem may not exist. I think it's the "food quality" (glycerin) of the straight vegetable oil that cooks inside the tip.

I hope this helps.

-Gary
1982 Chevy Luv 2wd short bed diesel w/ veggie conversion (under construction)
1999 Isuzu Trooper 3.5L Gas

User avatar
iPupGary
Regular Member
Posts: 505
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:56 pm
Location: Vancouver, WA

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby iPupGary » Sun Dec 13, 2015 4:31 pm

Clair,

Here is a short explanation of my de-watering process. I heat my vegetable oil above the boiling point of water before it enters the centrifuge.


Intake to Heater - Warm Dry Air Source

IMG_1052.JPG


Centrifuge with Exhaust and Air Intake Ports

IMG_1049.JPG


Exhaust Fan

IMG_1051.JPG


An industrial centrifuge can pull a vacuum and boil water at 130 F. These centrifuges cost many, many thousands of dollars because of their high flow rate and it's not easy to pull a vacuum in a centrifuge. Not to mention the fact that that don't sell many of them. A business with low volume equals a high priced product because of the fixed over costs of running a business. These centrifuges were originally designed to take the water out of petroleum products with low flash points, e.g. diesel flash point is ~144 F. To heat a petroleum product to the boiling point of water without a vaccum (212F) is asking for a fire.

I simply took this strategy and applied it to a low cost hobbyist / entry level professional centrifuge. Since veggie oil (soy bean) has a flash point of 600 F and a self ignition of 700 F, heating veggie oil above the boiling point is not an issue.

Centrifuges by themselves don't do a great job of de-watering because the specific gravity of water and oil isn't that much different. Water is somewhere around 8.2 pounds per gallon and veggie oil (depending on the type) is in the mid 7s. The centrifugal force of my centrifuge is about 3600 Gs' . It can take some of the free water out but not much. If I ran my oil through my centrifuge, without my heating process, it wouldn’t pass the infamous “Hot Pan” oil-in-water test. This is where you smear a little oil on the bottom of a frying pan and when the oil starts to smoke, you’ve reach the smoke point temperature of the oil. At that point you pour a baby food jar full of the sample oil into the pan and look for bubbles in the oil. If you see any bubbles, you have water in your oil.

WVO Designs Centrifuge Link

http://www.wvodesigns.com/extreme-raw-power-centrifuge.html

I'm not an expert in the chemistry of water in oil, but here is what I've learned. There are three types of water in oil; emulsified, ionized and free water. It's the free water that can damage your engine. Emulsified water in oil is similar to humidity in the air. It doesn't turn to free water until it reaches a colder temperature. So when people say oil and water don’t mix, that is simply not true. Free water and oil don't mix but emulsified does mix.

So the bottom line, it’s not the centrifugal force of the centrifuge that takes the water out of the oil but rather the turning of the water to steam by heating the oil above the boiling point of water that removes the water. As the oil enters the spinning centrifuge, the oil is dispersed in a mist like form and the water is turned to steam. I pump in warm dry air into one of the ¾” ports of the centrifuge and exhaust out the moist air (steam) out a second port of the centrifuge. I can take the worst junk off the bottom of my tote and clean and de-water the oil in one pass. When I say it removes the water I mean it passes the “Hot Pan” test. I will send out samples of my oil to a lab for actual water content analysis at some point.

Now if you want the specifics of how I heat the oil or any detail of this process, forget it. I’m tight lipped about the details of the method. Rest assured, it is no simple task to heat oil moving at a 25 GPH clip to the boiling point of water and maintain a tight temperature tolerance.

Keep in mind, you don’t want to heat the oil too much or you will reach the smoke point and may break down the properties of the oil. Also, you need to consistently keep the oil above the boiling point of water to turn it to steam. Also, you don’t want to waste energy by maintaining too high of a temperature or the cost per gallon for electricity will rise. So this translates in to maintaining a tight temperature tolerance of moving oil. And again it’s not a simple thing to do. You can’t do it with a dumb thermostat.

Again I’m no chemist. So if anyone would like to chime in and add or correct anything I’ve said, please feel free. We will all benefit from the dialog.

I hope this helps. I’ll answer a few questions but won’t get into the specific details of controlling the oil temperature.

Here is the steam coming out of that small Centrifuge 3/4" exhaust port. It takes my about 11 to process 275 gallons of oil.

https://youtu.be/9garBiw4JuQ

https://youtu.be/XgrBlL0B74Q


I hope this helps.

-Gary
1982 Chevy Luv 2wd short bed diesel w/ veggie conversion (under construction)
1999 Isuzu Trooper 3.5L Gas

Tigman
Regular Member
Posts: 515
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 7:36 pm
Location: Central Ohio
Isuzu vehicle(s): Factory 1985 S10 2.2 Diesel, 1989 Isuzu 4x4 2.2 Turbo Diesel, 1999 Chevy Suburban 6.5 Turbo Diesel

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby Tigman » Tue Dec 15, 2015 7:20 pm

Very impressive Gary, I have not done the frying pan test to my shame. I am probably walking of shakey ground. I need to do this test because I'm guessing there is emulsified water in my oil. I doubt it matters but I force filter (pump) my oil through a 1 micron industrial filter. I have not noticed any down sides in burning oil yet, that could change. My son uses a centrifuge and was under the understanding that H2O was removed as many of us were. What prompted you to undertake this removal of moisture, have you had issues since burning oil? Thanks for this great post. I am still most interested in the wood stove/oil alterations and your future input regarding the data collected. Thanks

User avatar
iPupGary
Regular Member
Posts: 505
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:56 pm
Location: Vancouver, WA

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby iPupGary » Wed Dec 16, 2015 8:56 pm

Clair,

Here is a link to a procedure to the infamous “Hot Pan” Test. This test is not a quantitative test but rather a “Go/No-Go” evaluation. I think the real downside to all bio-fuels is water. Bio-fuels seem to be a sponge for water.

This guy claims that emulsified and free water are bad for your engine. The dissolved (ionized) water isn’t an issue according to this guy’s research. My original research said only the free water was damaging. Check this link out:

http://svotutorial.org/index.php/WVO/wvo-and-water.html

My injection pump went out on my Pup. Fixing the Pup is next on my agenda. I don’t know why my IP failed. The truck is 33+ years old and still using the original IP from what I can tell. So did the Injection Pump (IP) failed because of veggie or was it just getting old? At this point I don’t know. My current dewatering process is orders of magnitude better than my previous dewatering process.

The previous process used an aeration method to dewater my oil as a separate 4 hour process from my 4 hour centrifuge process. I would heat the oil to 170 F and circulate the waste oil (Prior to the centrifuge filtering process) using a gear pump. The spray head was a drying head sold by Utah bio-fuels. They recommended drying the oil for up to 6 hours. Here are some photos of that process:


Old Oboslete WVO Filtering and De-watering Process

DSCN3795.JPG


DSCN4141.JPG


Drying Head would fan the oil to create large surface area to dry the oil.

This process would heat the oil to 170 F. Not even close to boiling point of water.

The oil would spray against a half filled 55 gallon steel drum.

The de-watering process took 3 to 4 hours to complete.

The Centrifuge filtering process was another 4 hours.

DSCN4142.JPG


My old process could process 8 gallons per hour at a cost of 4.5 cents per gallon of electricity to clean and de-water. It got most of the water out. The samples I took did pass the “Hot Pan” test. However, if the clean/dry oil sat around too long it seem to reintroduce water back into the oil. I’m not sure if it was emulsified water in the oil that turned to free water because of a lower temperature or did the water re-introduce itself by the moisture in air from a half filled tote that caused the water to get back into the oil…I’m not sure.

I can’t see how this drying process could possibly be that successful if the oil is heated to only 170F. Pumping oil any hotter using remote heating hoses is very dangerous. If a hose were to break, it wouldn’t take long to make a real mess. Oil above 170 F can burn you as well.

My new process heats the oil to 223 to 230 degrees. When the oil is dropped into the centrifuge the water turns to steam. I was blown away when I took the worst junk off the bottom of my tote and it passed the “Hot Pan” test without a hint of bubbles in the oil.

Before/After Oil Sample with New Process.

The Clean sample passed the "Hot Pan" test without a hint of water.
This is the worst sample, junk off the bottom of the tote.
I gave it my worst WVO and it passed with flying colors.
This motivated me to redesign my entire process... to good to pass up!

IMG_1080.JPG


The junk off the bottom of my tote is the junk most people throw away. To have it pass the hot pan test in one pass took my breath away! So I totally dismantled my old processor and designed a computer system to run the new processor. I can now process 275 gallons in 11 hour at a cost of 2 cents a gallon for electricity. The new process uses more electricity but it can process oil to the maximum capacity of the WVO Designs Raw Power Extreme Centrifuge: 25 gallons per hour.

The process I use now is much safer. Although I do heat the oil hotter (223 to 230F) with my new process, the new process does it without any hoses. The heating elements are attached directly to the centrifuge, just inches away from the entry point of the centrifuge. Also, the oil is gravity fed under low pressure to the centrifuge and my computer controller performs a series of safety temperature checks using 3 different temperature sensors. If the absolute temperature of any of the sensors is above normal or if the oil temperature difference between the in the heating element temperature and the oil entering the centrifuge is outside the normal range, the computer controller will shutdown the entire processor. Also the new process is safe because there is little oxygen in the oil hoses and the heating elements. If for some reason the oil temperature did get above 700 F the fire would quickly burn itself out due to the lack of oxygen.

So the bottom line is the new WVO processing method is safer, lower cost per gallon, does a better job of dewatering and faster than my old method. And with a computer controller running the entire process, I can leave it unattended while it processes 275 gallons of oil over a 11 hour period.

I'll post some more photos of my processor soon.

-Gary
1982 Chevy Luv 2wd short bed diesel w/ veggie conversion (under construction)
1999 Isuzu Trooper 3.5L Gas

User avatar
JoeIsuzu
Site Admin
Posts: 20519
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 9:11 am
Location: Germantown (next to Elvistown), TN
Isuzu vehicle(s): Original owner, '83 LS Diesel, 5-spd, 2wd, Long Bed, restoration in progress!

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby JoeIsuzu » Wed Dec 16, 2015 9:21 pm

iPupGary wrote:My injection pump went out on my Pup. Fixing the Pup is next on my agenda. I don’t know why my IP failed. The truck is 33+ years old and still using the original IP from what I can tell. So did the Injection Pump (IP) failed because of veggie or was it just getting old? At this point I don’t know. My current dewatering process is orders of magnitude better than my previous dewatering process.

What prompted the diagnosis of pump failure? Not that I doubt you, but can you tell what failed? Did the input shaft break, or something else?

Jack

User avatar
iPupGary
Regular Member
Posts: 505
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:56 pm
Location: Vancouver, WA

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby iPupGary » Wed Dec 16, 2015 10:40 pm

Hi Jack,

The Pup has been sitting for a while. I'm almost embarrassed to say how long my Pup has been sitting. I've been so busy with my other projects I just let it sit. But I'm planning to dive into after the WVO Processor project is complete this Friday.

I'm also going to add the sealed crankcase oil system on my old ''82 LUV. I also bought a cool aluminum radiator (Universal Radiator from eBay Store) to replace the aging Pup radiator. So many upgrades will happen along with the IP fix (cross your fingers). I'm also going to place a electric fan with a shroud to replace my old electric fan. This should bring some great cooling to the Pup.

And on the veggie side, I'm going to install a vacuum actuated coolant valve to shut off the coolant to the veggie flat plate heat exchanger when the veggie gets too hot. I stressed one of my veggie switching valves by getting it too hot. The coolant temperature and the veggie oil temperature can be as little as 5 degrees different in the summer time. These valves are rated to a max of 212 degrees F but I think anything over 200F really stresses these valve. Having a coolant shut-off valve on the heat exchanger will allow me to regulate the high end of the veggie temperature to about 190 F... another lesson learned by doing!!!

To answer your question, JLemond helped me diagnose the most probable cause, the IP. Also, PTSteve also gave some good input as well. So here is what I did.

1) Truck just died while driving down the road.

2) Towed it home.

3) The glow plug system was functioning fine. The relay click sound delay was your typical 6 to 7 seconds when "All is Well." Also the sense resistor was getting hot so I assumed the glow plugs were okay as well. The engine was warm because it was previously running, so a hot motor should start without the glow plug system anyway, so I assumed no issues with the glow plug system.

4) I checked to see if fuel was getting to the IP. I use a lift pump on the diesel side so it was easy to verify by removing the hose to the input of the IP and turning on the pump. I simply put my thumb over the hose to check for fuel pressure from the diesel lift pump. All was well.

5) So the pump looked good. My next thought was fuel cut-off switch went bad or no power to the cut-off solenoid coil. I first measure the solenoid coil resistance and it looked good. I hot wired the fuel cut-off solenoid and it drew a reasonable amount of current and I could hear the solenoid go clunk when it was energized.

6) My next though was something mechanical inside the fuel cut-off solenoid went "belly-up." So JLemond suggested to remove the guts of the solenoid and replace it back into the IP. I was ready to pull the fuel line, because if it did start, disconnecting the fuel line was the only way to stop a running Pup without a cut-off switch. It still didn't start.

7) JLemond suggested checking the built in fuel filter screen in the IP fuel connection. I pulled this off and it looked fine, but I cleaned the screen anyway just to be on the safe side.

8) I did a compression check on the motor. The compression was close to or as good as a new motor. Mark did a head job on the Red Pup before I bought so the fact it had excellent compression made total sense. Compression Okay...

9) As a side note, JLemond just recently rebuilt my Injectors. The Pup performance was excellent with the rebuilt injectors. Before the rebuild, the engine was running rough. This prompted me to rebuild the injectors.

10) So JLemond suggested I that remove the each of the 4 IP distribution fuel connections one at a time and Place a piece of dry paper in front of the IP connection to detect if any diesel was discharging from the IP when the engine was cranking. After checking all four distribution ports, I detected no fuel from the IP from any of the ports.

11) Also, when I cranked the engine there was absolutely no hint that this engine was going to run. It acted like it was getting zero fuel.

12) PTSteve told me that the IP has a sacrificial part inside the IP that when this part breaks the IP will just free wheel and not turn the IP Pump.

So based on this process, I ruled out everything else, The only thing left is the IP.

What do you think? I think it's time to rebuild the IP anyway. After 33 years it deserves to be rebuilt. I'm also curious to see how the veggie has treated my IP. My old veggie de-watering process wasn't very good. It wouldn't surprise me to see some veggie water damage. My new WVO Process is so much better!!!

-Gary
1982 Chevy Luv 2wd short bed diesel w/ veggie conversion (under construction)
1999 Isuzu Trooper 3.5L Gas

Tigman
Regular Member
Posts: 515
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 7:36 pm
Location: Central Ohio
Isuzu vehicle(s): Factory 1985 S10 2.2 Diesel, 1989 Isuzu 4x4 2.2 Turbo Diesel, 1999 Chevy Suburban 6.5 Turbo Diesel

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby Tigman » Sat Dec 19, 2015 1:50 pm

Gary, thanks for sharing the info on the IP situation, is Paul doing the rebuild? I ordered my nozzle and adapter from Patriot, however had to go with the other brand that they advertise. The Delvans were back ordered and I didn't want to wait, anxious to get it going. Please keep us posted on any finding, I'm especially interested in your chimney increase or decrease in buildup. From the way it looks it should be fine maybe even cleaner, that's what I seeking, not that I have that much but some. Regards, Merry Christmas, Clair

User avatar
iPupGary
Regular Member
Posts: 505
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:56 pm
Location: Vancouver, WA

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby iPupGary » Wed Dec 23, 2015 4:57 pm

Clair,

There is an IP rebuild company in my backyard, Portland OR. They are so close I'll give them a try. I hope to get on this project after the Holidays.

Let me know how your project goes. I just received the Banjo mini T-filter w/ 3/4" NPT female connections. I'm going to give it a try. It was considerably cheaper than the one Patriot was selling. The small 50 micron filter I was using would plug up about every other day. This larger 297 micron filter should work better. My main problem was an old container that had some dried veggie on the bottom of the container that was working loose. This filter will be easy to clean. The other 50 micron filter was a throwaway filter that I was cleaning by hand…what a pain.

If you are careful to only burn with veggie when the stove is piping hot you should be okay. It takes me about 30 minutes of dry wood only burning to ensure the veggie will ignite and burn cleanly with my stove. If you take the extra step off turning the air and veggie when you open the wood stove door this will be a big plus. After opening the stove door and reloading the stove with wood, I would wait about 1 to 2 minutes for the fire box to come up to temperature before switching on the air and veggie fuel.


IMG_1087.JPG


Here is the link to Banjo's site. They make some great affordable products. If you try this 50 mesh (297 micron) filter, make sure to purchase the Viton (FKM) seal part number: UV10264V

http://www.banjocorp.com/liquid-handling/1199-mini-t-line-strainer-_75-inch-clear-bowl-lstm075-50c

Snap1.jpg


The EPDM Rubber seal should last a while but the Viton should give you a much longer service life.

-Gary
1982 Chevy Luv 2wd short bed diesel w/ veggie conversion (under construction)
1999 Isuzu Trooper 3.5L Gas

User avatar
iPupGary
Regular Member
Posts: 505
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:56 pm
Location: Vancouver, WA

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby iPupGary » Thu Dec 24, 2015 3:50 pm

Clair,

See the diagram below. Make sure to angle your pipe into the stove or you may have a mess. Sometimes when the stove is not hot enough the vapor will turn into a liquid.

Tube Design1.jpg


-Gary
1982 Chevy Luv 2wd short bed diesel w/ veggie conversion (under construction)
1999 Isuzu Trooper 3.5L Gas

Tigman
Regular Member
Posts: 515
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 7:36 pm
Location: Central Ohio
Isuzu vehicle(s): Factory 1985 S10 2.2 Diesel, 1989 Isuzu 4x4 2.2 Turbo Diesel, 1999 Chevy Suburban 6.5 Turbo Diesel

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby Tigman » Thu Dec 24, 2015 8:05 pm

Gary, thanks, this sounds like a very good thought, hope it wasn't an after thought for you! There are always ideas and improvements that manifest themselves as a project is in the proving stages. That filter looks like a smart investment aswell. Merry Christmas you and all on the forum. Clair

User avatar
iPupGary
Regular Member
Posts: 505
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:56 pm
Location: Vancouver, WA

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby iPupGary » Thu Dec 24, 2015 9:26 pm

Clair,

No fortunately it wasn't a mistake I made but the guy on the alternative fuel site. I looked at his photos and saw a total mess on the floor. I brained stormed why this could be happening. I figured that the vapor must be turning into a liquid. So I angled the tube so it could at least flow into the stove.

Also, extend the tube far enough into the stove so it can drip into the fire box rather on the interior side of the wood stove. If the veggie liquid gets between the fire stone and the wall it may not be hot enough to ignite the veggie and may create a gooey mess... I hope this makes sense.

Be sure to use nice dry fire wood so the stove temperature can get up to temperature as soon as possible. Once the veggie ignites the stove throws out great heat. I'm heating my 2000 sq ft. home plus my 800 square foot garage to 72+ degrees F with a tiny Pendleton Avalon stove.

-Gary
1982 Chevy Luv 2wd short bed diesel w/ veggie conversion (under construction)
1999 Isuzu Trooper 3.5L Gas

User avatar
iPupGary
Regular Member
Posts: 505
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:56 pm
Location: Vancouver, WA

Re: Veggie Wood Burning Stove

Postby iPupGary » Thu Dec 24, 2015 9:27 pm

Here is video updating my latest progress:

https://youtu.be/Bd7HOZGzXhs

-Gary
1982 Chevy Luv 2wd short bed diesel w/ veggie conversion (under construction)
1999 Isuzu Trooper 3.5L Gas